Category Archives: Water

ZIMBABWE: Researchers Developing New Ways to Purify Water

By Busani Bafana and Zahira Kharsany

Moringa flowers - the seeds of this versatile tree can be used to sterilise drinking water. Credit: J.M. Garg/Wiki Commons
Moringa flowers - the seeds of this versatile tree can be used to sterilise drinking water. Credit: J.M. Garg/Wiki Commons

BULAWAYO, Mar 25 (IPS) – Scientists at Bulawayo’s National University of Science and Technology (NUST) have embarked on research to develop simple and affordable water purification methods, as more than a billion people live without safe drinking water in developing countries.

Water and sanitation experts are currently investigating if a powder made from the seeds of the Moringa Oleifera, commonly known as the drumstick or horseradish tree, can be used as a filter to purify water.
Continue reading ZIMBABWE: Researchers Developing New Ways to Purify Water

Noah – the first environmentalist with a water problem?

Ecumenical Water Network

Then the Lord said to Noah, ‘Go into the ark, you and all your household, for I have seen that you alone are righteous before me in this generation. (Genesis 7:1)

Noah – the first environmentalist with a water problem?

lent5Water is a big issue and a question of justice. For some communities there is no water to irrigate land, or clean water to wash and drink. For other communities there may be plenty of water but it comes in unwelcome destructive episodes whether deluge from the sky, floods from rivers or the rising tide of the sea. The issues are painfully familiar to an increasing number of people, but the grim reality is that due to global warming and the climate change that results, things are getting worse. The injustice of flood and drought affect the world’s poor disproportionately. Without significant change in human behaviour, science tells us that the future is potentially catastrophic. Water confronts all of us with questions about sustainability and our ecological debt. Continue reading Noah – the first environmentalist with a water problem?

No one owns water, it is God’s gift

lent4 “So he came to a Samaritan city called Sychar, near the plot of ground that Jacob had given to his son Joseph. Jacob’s well was there, and Jesus, tired out by his journey, was sitting by the well. It was about noon. A Samaritan woman came to draw water and Jesus said to her, “Give me a drink.” (His disciples had gone to the city to buy food.) The Samaritan woman said to him, “How is it that you, a Jew, ask a drink from me, a woman of Samaria?” (Jews do not share things in common with Samaritans.) Jesus answered her, “If you knew the gift of God, and who it is that is saying to you, ‘Give me a drink,’ you would have asked him, and he would have given you living water.” (John 4: 5-10). Continue reading No one owns water, it is God’s gift

Water, symbol of our relationship with God

You trample on the poor
and force them to give you grain.
Therefore, though you have built stone mansions,
you will not live in them;
though you have planted lush vineyards,
you will not drink their wine.

Amos 5:11

Water, symbol of our relationship with God

lent3Water is symbolic of our relationship with God, carrying the image of renewal, promise and hope. It is through water that we are baptized into the community of the church. Furthermore, water is essential to all life on Earth, and it links human life to the rest of God’s creation. Creation begins with God calling life out of the water (Genesis 1:2). The human body itself is made up mainly of water. We can go for weeks without food, but only a few days without water. It is through water that all of creation is gifted with life, and life in all of its various forms is not possible without water. Continue reading Water, symbol of our relationship with God

Lent Week 2: Dealing with our own sewage: A Jordan River perspective

While all Israel were crossing over on dry ground, the priests who bore the ark of the covenant of the Lord stood on dry ground in the middle of the Jordan, until the entire nation finished crossing over the Jordan. (Joshua 3:15-17)

Dealing with our own sewage: A Jordan River perspective

lent2The cholera crisis in Zimbabwe is a chilling illustration of the crucial link between water, sanitation, health and political responsibility. By the middle of February 2009, the WHO noted that over 70,000 people were infected and 3,524 had died. We all live downstream Cholera is a clear indication that economics and ecology are deeply integrated, and that water is at the intersection of the two. The economic system, via industry, agriculture, and the human impact upon climate change is placing huge stress on our water resources, and in turn these diminishing resources impact severely upon the quality of life of the poor and marginalized. Continue reading Lent Week 2: Dealing with our own sewage: A Jordan River perspective