Controversial Swiss theologian pleads with Pope Francis to solve problem of infallibility

The Tablet

Hans Küng believes that the future well-being of the church is wrapped up in question of infallibility

by Hans Küng
kungEXCLUSIVE: Controversial Swiss theologian pleads with Pope Francis to solve problem of infallibility EXCLUSIVE: Controversial Swiss theologian pleads with Pope Francis to solve problem of infallibility.

Next week, Hans Küng, the Catholic priest and Swiss theologian, will celebrate his 88th birthday. The fifth volume of his complete works, titled Infallibility, has just become available from the German publishing house Herder & Herder. In connection with the release of Infallibility, Küng has written the following “urgent appeal to Pope Francis to permit an open and impartial discussion on infallibility of pope and bishops.” The text of this appeal is being release simultaneously by National Catholic Reporter and The Tablet. Continue reading Controversial Swiss theologian pleads with Pope Francis to solve problem of infallibility

Ikea to use packaging made from mushrooms that will decompose in a garden within weeks

National Post

env2

LONDON — Ikea is planning to use packaging made with mushrooms as an eco-friendly replacement for polystyrene.

The furniture retailer is looking at using the biodegradable mycelium “fungi packaging” as part of its efforts to reduce waste and increase recycling, Joanna Yarrow, head of sustainability for Ikea in the U.K., said.

Mycelium is the part of a fungus that effectively acts as its roots. It grows in a mass of branched fibres, attaching itself to the soil or whatever surface it is growing on. Continue reading Ikea to use packaging made from mushrooms that will decompose in a garden within weeks

Nigeria: Eight Issues That Buhari’s Economic Summit Must Address

All Africa

nig

Economists, private sector players, labour leaders, policy analysts and all Nigerians who are concerned about the parlous state of the Nigerian economy are eagerly awaiting federal government’s announcement of dates and modalities for a summit on the economy, which the President Muhammadu Buhari administration has agreed to convene.

Nobel laureate Professor Wole Soyinka had mid last month, while paying a courtesy call on the Minister of Information and Culture, Alhaji Lai Mohammed in Abuja, urged President Buhari to convene an emergency economic conference to enable experts brainstorm on how to turn the economy around. Continue reading Nigeria: Eight Issues That Buhari’s Economic Summit Must Address

Pope tells corrupt benefactors that church doesn’t need ‘dirty money’

Catholic News Service

By Carol Glatz

church0

VATICAN CITY (CNS) — Speaking out against exploitation and unfair wages for workers, Pope Francis told benefactors to forget about donating money to the church if their earnings came from mistreating others.

“Please, take your check back and burn it,” he said to applause.

“The people of God — that is, the church — don’t need dirty money. They need hearts that are open to God’s mercy,” the pope said March 2 during his general audience in St. Peter’s Square.
God wants people to turn away from evil and do what is just, not cover up their sins with gestures of sacrifice, he said. Continue reading Pope tells corrupt benefactors that church doesn’t need ‘dirty money’

How Sister Judy Tensing became Cincinnati’s unlikeliest entrepreneur

SoapBox

Liz McEwan
usa1

In 2006, when Over-the-Rhine’s Vine Street had just begun its building by building transformation, Sister Judy Tensing brought the neighborhood one of its first new retail businesses: Venice on Vine.

Serving up classic Italian street side fare — pizza, hoagies, pasta, etc. — Venice on Vine also provides catering services to local businesses, churches and organizations. The restaurant is the grandchild of a job-training initiative started 30 years ago at the West End Center on Ezzard Charles Drive. Continue reading How Sister Judy Tensing became Cincinnati’s unlikeliest entrepreneur

Migrant mothers bridge distance with virtual parenting

Deutsche Wella

Migrant parents are using social media to raise their kids from afar. But a virtual presence enabled by technology is hardly a substitute for the intimacy of physical closeness. Ana P. Santos reports from Paris.

mig15

It is nearly midnight and like most working mothers, 39-year-old Gemma, is preparing for the next school day before turning in.

It is about 5:30 a.m. in the Philippines and Gemma picks up her phone and goes on Viber to wake up her nine-year-old son, Vlad, and her husband, Nielson.

If the soft whir of the Viber ring doesn’t wake them up, she will try Skype from the laptop on the stump of a nightstand next to her bed.

“If that still doesn’t work, I’ll try calling the landline. That’s the loudest, you can hear it ring throughout the entire house,” said Gemma, chuckling at the familiar struggle of rousing a young child from slumber. Continue reading Migrant mothers bridge distance with virtual parenting