Examining Our Social Sins

America Magazine
Daniel P. Horan
Lent is a time dedicated to evaluation and reflection, conversion and return to God. But what does it mean to embrace honestly an examination of conscience at a time and in a world where racism, violence and environmental degradation are so present?
Over the last few months, our attention has been drawn to events that reflect persistent structures of inequity and injustice in our society. Because we are all interrelated in ways that are not always easily recognized, few are willing to take responsibility for the abiding reality of social sin. It can be so satisfying and self-gratifying to assess our lives and actions by what we have done that we ignore the evangelical challenge to confess our responsibility for what we have failed to do. Continue reading Examining Our Social Sins

Can multinationals deliver selfless community projects?

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Nigerian oil and gas company Oando is trying to encourage thousands of girls to register for school for the first time.

The Guardian

Community projects undertaken by big multinationals, however well-meaning, often lack community involvement and focus on what they give rather than the long-term impact

Oliver Balch

Today, Nigeria has the most out-of-school children in the world – some 10.5 million, the majority of them girls. This April could see a small dent in that number as Nigerian oil and gas company Oando seeks to encourage thousands of girls to register for primary school for the first time. Continue reading Can multinationals deliver selfless community projects?

Follow our love for the poor: Dorothy Stang

Global Sisters Report

This essay is an adaptation of the homily given at the Caldwell Chapel community Mass on the Catholic University of America Campus, Feb. 8, 2015.

Today we honor Dorothy Stang, a Sister of Notre Dame, a sister like Denise and Cita and myself, a woman we knew either personally or by reputation before the six bullets fired into her body on Feb. 12, 2005 brought her to the attention of the larger world. The word martyr still doesn’t sound right to me in speaking of Dorothy, a very vibrant, loving woman, who was as stubborn as she was gentle, who not only spoke truth to power, but acted on what she knew to be true.

Her story confronts us with the raw reality of the economic power that is destroying our planet. It confronts us with a Gospel response to this power.
Continue reading Follow our love for the poor: Dorothy Stang