Orphaned by deportation: the crisis of American children left behind

Guardian

Andrés Jiménez, under the guardianship of a Florida ‘fairy godmother’ after his father’s deportation, is one of hundreds of children whose families are broken by a fickle system

Andrés on MSNBC petitioning President Obama. Photograph: Screengrab/MSNBC
Andrés on MSNBC petitioning President Obama. Photograph: Screengrab/MSNBC

Ten-year-old Andrés Jiménez was looking forward to the end of summer. Not because he was particularly eager to return to school, but because the end of summer was meant to be the president’s deadline for taking action on immigration.  But Obama’s deadline came and went, and with it Andrés’s hopes of reuniting his family after his father was wrenched from his life three years ago. Continue reading Orphaned by deportation: the crisis of American children left behind

Hysteria Over Ebola Fuels Racism, While the Real Disease Is Capitalism

Common Dreams

Sonali Kolhatkar

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention director Dr. Thomas Frieden attends via teleconference, while U.S. Representative to the U.N. Samantha Power and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Martin Dempsey listen as President Obama speaks to the media about Ebola during a meeting at the White House on Wednesday. (Photo: AP/Jacquelyn Martin)
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention director Dr. Thomas Frieden attends via teleconference, while U.S. Representative to the U.N. Samantha Power and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Martin Dempsey listen as President Obama speaks to the media about Ebola during a meeting at the White House on Wednesday. (Photo: AP/Jacquelyn Martin)

The Ebola crisis has gripped the American media, and by extension the imagination of the public, punctuated by breathless pronouncements from TV news reporters of the medical status of actual and potential victims of the disease; hysteria-inducing magazine covers, like this issue of Bloomberg Business week sporting the message “Ebola Is Coming” in blood- smeared letters; and Facebook feeds dominated by click-bait images of microscopic photos of the virus with eerie back-lit tangles of fat worms symbolizing the foreign bodies that could invade us all.

But the foreign bodies of the Liberian man, Thomas Eric Duncan, the first person to have developed the disease while on U.S. soil, and those of West Africans represent the common targets of an age-old American disease: xenophobia. Continue reading Hysteria Over Ebola Fuels Racism, While the Real Disease Is Capitalism

Remember Ken Saro-Wiwa and the Ogoni Nine

EarthRights International

by Valentina Stackl

Ken Saro-Wiwa
Ken Saro-Wiwa

On November 10, 1995, internationally renowned author and human rights and environmental activist Ken Saro-Wiwa and eight other Ogoni men were hanged in Port Harcourt, Nigeria. Arrested and held for months without charges, tortured while under detention, and sentenced to death by a “Special Tribunal” convened in violation of international law.  They were executed for their peaceful efforts to defend the indigenous Ogoni people of Nigeria from human rights and environment abuses caused by oil extraction activities of Shell Nigeria. For his relentless commitment, Ken Saro-Wiwa was awarded the 1995 Goldman Environmental Prize.

To this day, despite facts that tie Shell to his murder and to the continuing abuse of the Ogoni people, Shell still denies culpability and continues to drill for oil in Nigeria.