Sell out African food & farming system

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African agriculture and its farmers are evermore under pressure to maintain local food systems that produce culturally adapted food. For decades African agriculture has been in dire need of investment. In the latter half of the 20th century, investment came to the continent, but it was not targeted at African farmers. The current flow of agricultural investment is focused just on export-based industrial agriculture, while smallholders and family agriculture remain deprived of investment. In this brief article we will try to articulate under how much pressure African farmers are from the vagaries of international markets as well as international policies. Continue reading Sell out African food & farming system

Catholics and Climate Divestment: An Update

America

Nathan Schneider

Drawing created during the first morning of the Omega Institute conference by David Hasbury of Neighbours International.
Drawing created during the first morning of the Omega Institute conference by David Hasbury of Neighbours International.

We may be learning to see, and to value, our commons again.

In my last print column for America, I wrote about the intersection between Catholic tradition and the notion of the commons—a kind of economy in which shared treasures are governed by those who depend on them, not by a state or market. Since then, I had the chance to attend “Building the Collaborative Commons,” at the Omega Institute in New York’s Hudson Valley, where more than 500 people participated in the largest U.S. meeting on the commons in recent memory. This was a major event. I wrote about its significance for Al Jazeera America. Continue reading Catholics and Climate Divestment: An Update

Drop That Plate Right Now: Cops Arrest 90-Year-Old Advocate and Clergy For Scary Crime of Feeding the Hungry

Common Dreams

Abby Zimet, staff writer

Watch Video
Watch Video

Bound by faith and virtue to resist newly passed “homeless hate laws” in Fort Lauderdale, a 90-year-old homeless advocate and two ministers were arrested by a phalanx of burly cops for resolutely continuing to share food with homeless people in public, part of a “week of resistance” to a growing body of laws there and in at least 20 other cities that criminalize poor people by restricting their panhandling, camping, storing belongings, going to the bathroom and other activities deemed “life sustaining” to the homeless – that is, essentially, for existing. Continue reading Drop That Plate Right Now: Cops Arrest 90-Year-Old Advocate and Clergy For Scary Crime of Feeding the Hungry

New Research Points to Vast Deforestation in Peru

Peruvian Times

New research by the Lima-based Instituto del Bien Comun, a non-governmental organization that promotes indigenous rights and environmental stewardship, has found that 1.42 million hectares (3.5 million acres) have been deforested in the Peruvian Amazon.

The Peruvian Amazon Map 2014 said that about 25% of the land that has been cut down was on indigenous territory and protected natural areas, daily Gestion reported. Continue reading New Research Points to Vast Deforestation in Peru

Texas oil town makes history as residents say no to fracking

The Guardian

Suzanne Goldenberg

 In this 15 July 2014 file photo, anti-fracking protesters hold a campaign sign outside city hall, in Denton, Texas. Photograph: Tony Gutierrez/AP
In this 15 July 2014 file photo, anti-fracking protesters hold a campaign sign outside city hall, in Denton, Texas. Photograph: Tony Gutierrez/AP

The Texas town where America’s oil and natural gas boom began has voted to ban fracking, in a stunning rebuke to the industry.

Denton, a college town on the edge of the Barnett Shale, voted by 59% to ban fracking inside the city limits, a first for any locality in Texas. Continue reading Texas oil town makes history as residents say no to fracking

Nigeria: More than 50,000 Violence-Displaced People in North-East Get Aid

NewsfromAfrica

Most displaced people who arrived in Maiduguri in the past few months were settled in government buildings, schools or official camps. Some stayed with relatives or host families, with whom they shared scant resources, while others found refuge in informal settlements.

LAGOS — Thousands of people displaced by conflict in north-eastern Nigeria have taken refuge in Maiduguri.

On 3 November, the ICRC and the Nigerian Red Cross Society completed the distribution of food and household essentials to over 50,000 people living in extremely difficult conditions. “Not only did people have to flee their homes in Kodunga, Kaga, Gwoza and Damboa, they also lost all their belongings and their means of earning a living. They didn’t have enough food and they lacked important basic items,” said Karl Mattli, head of the ICRC delegation in Nigeria. “The additional strain placed on communities by hosting the displaced reached the point where it was more than they could bear.”
Continue reading Nigeria: More than 50,000 Violence-Displaced People in North-East Get Aid