‘Remember Fukushima’: Thousands Rally Against Nuclear Restart in Japan

Common Dreams

Nobel laureate Kenzaburo Oe: “Three and a half years have passed since the nuclear accident, but self-examination has yet to be made.”

Lauren McCauley, staff writer

"We don't need nukes!" declared the roughly 16,000 protesters who rallied outside of the residence of Japan Prime Minister Shinzo on Tuesday. (Photo: via Chika_Sara)
“We don’t need nukes!” declared the roughly 16,000 protesters who rallied outside of the residence of Japan Prime Minister Shinzo on Tuesday. (Photo: via Chika_Sara)

“Don’t forget Fukushima” was the message Tuesday morning as roughly 16,000 people gathered in downtown Tokyo to protest the restart of Japan’s nuclear power plants.

The demonstration, held outside the official residence of Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, came a day after the government outlined plans to restart two reactors at the Sendai nuclear plant in southern Japan at a five-day meeting of the International Atomic Energy Agency, Jiji News reports. Continue reading ‘Remember Fukushima’: Thousands Rally Against Nuclear Restart in Japan

‘Gucci Grace’ poised to lead post-Mugabe Zimbabwe

Mail & Guardian

Grace Mugabe recently attained a PhD a few months after enrolling, and as the head of Zanu-PF's Women's League, looks poised to take her husband's place at Zimbabwe's helm. (Reuters)
Grace Mugabe recently attained a PhD a few months after enrolling, and as the head of Zanu-PF’s Women’s League, looks poised to take her husband’s place at Zimbabwe’s helm. (Reuters)

Soon after being shoe-horned into the top ranks of Zimbabwe’s ruling party, the wife of aging leader Robert Mugabe has gained a PhD in orphanages, seen as the latest sign that she may be destined for high office.

In a country where the path to power is paved with academic letters, analysts said the timing of the first lady’s surprise qualification was no coincidence. Continue reading ‘Gucci Grace’ poised to lead post-Mugabe Zimbabwe

Irish Bishop halts plan for Permanent Diaconate after women protest

Independent Catholic News
By: Claire Bergin

The bishop of one of the largest dioceses in Ireland, has put on hold plans to introduce the Permanent Diaconate, after consulting with Pastoral Leadership groups, several of whom had protested that many functions of the proposed deaconate are already being performed by laywomen – who cannot apply to become deacons. Continue reading Irish Bishop halts plan for Permanent Diaconate after women protest

#FloodWallStreet: Protesters Stage Mass Action to Confront Climate Profiteers

Common Dreams

Action takes direct aim at center of global capitalism to call for complete paradigm shift to save planet from climate chaos

(Image via FloodWallStreet)
(Image via FloodWallStreet)

Just hours after roughly 400,000 packed the streets of New York City for the People’s Climate March, a flood of people marched to the city’s financial district to target what they say is the root of the climate crisis: capitalism itself. Continue reading #FloodWallStreet: Protesters Stage Mass Action to Confront Climate Profiteers

Sister Dorothy Stang’s killer rearrested, linked to three murders

SAO PAULO (CNS) — Rayfran das Neves Sales, the convicted killer of U.S. Sister Dorothy Stang, was arrested Sept. 19. He was accused of being involved in the murders of three people in the northern state of Para. Sales served a little less than eight years of a 27-year sentence for shooting Sister Dorothy, a member of the Notre Dame de Namur Sisters who had U.S. and Brazilian citizenship. Sales had been under house arrest since June 2013 due to good behavior in prison. Sister Dorothy, 73, at the time of her death in 2005, was born in Dayton, Ohio. She had lived in the Amazon region for nearly four decades, working closely with the Brazilian bishops’ Pastoral Land Commission in favor of land rights for the poor and for sustainable development in the region.

Peru creates new anti-logging commission after murders

BBC

Edwin Chota, indigenous leader, killed 8 September 2014 The commission was announced after the murder of anti-logging activist Edwin Chota (pictured) and three other indigenous leaders
Edwin Chota, indigenous leader, killed 8 September 2014 The commission was announced after the murder of anti-logging activist Edwin Chota (pictured) and three other indigenous leaders

The Peruvian government says it will investigate illegal logging along the Peru-Brazil border following the murder of four indigenous leaders.

The leaders were killed in early September, allegedly by loggers.

The Peruvian President of the Council of Ministers, Ana Jara Velasquez, announced a commission which she said would have powers to stop the logging. Continue reading Peru creates new anti-logging commission after murders

Can ‘Womenomics’ Stem the Feminisation of Poverty in Japan?

By Suvendrini Kakuchi

Women now comprise the majority of the poor and old in Japan, the world’s third largest economy and fastest-aging society. Credit: S. H. isado/CC BY-ND 2.0
Women now comprise the majority of the poor and old in Japan, the world’s third largest economy and fastest-aging society. Credit: S. H. isado/CC BY-ND 2.0

TOKYO, Sep 18 2014 (IPS) – Fifty-four-year-old Marlyn Maeda, an unmarried freelance writer living in Tokyo who never held a permanent job, is now watching her dream of aging independently go up in smoke.

“I work four jobs and barely survive,” said the writer, who disclosed only her penname to IPS. Her monthly income after writing articles, working at a call centre, selling cosmetics five days a week and working one night at a bar hovers at close to 1,600 dollars. Continue reading Can ‘Womenomics’ Stem the Feminisation of Poverty in Japan?

Kingdom of Slaves

In the smallest Gulf kingdoms, upwards of 90 percent of residents are immigrant laborers. Many face unspeakable abuse.

Foreign Policy in Focus

By Sam Badger and Giorgio Cafiero, September 12, 2014.
This article is a joint publication of Foreign Policy In Focus and TheNation.com.

The plight of foreign laborers in the Gulf—who make up large majorities of the population in the smaller emirates—underscores a dark underside to the modern, glossy exterior the GCC states like to showcase to the world. (Photo: Rebel Against Injustice / Flickr)
The plight of foreign laborers in the Gulf—who make up large majorities of the population in the smaller emirates—underscores a dark underside to the modern, glossy exterior the GCC states like to showcase to the world. (Photo: Rebel Against Injustice / Flickr)

Since FIFA picked Qatar to host the 2022 World Cup, the tiny and uber-rich Gulf emirate has increasingly come under scrutiny for its failure to protect the human rights of its burgeoning foreign workforce.
Continue reading Kingdom of Slaves

Biden, a Catholic School ‘Kid,’ Praises Nuns Under Fire From the Vatican

New York Times

By JASON HOROWITZ

Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. spoke on Wednesday in front of the statehouse in Des Moines as he helped a group of social justice activists kick off their 10-state “Nuns on the Bus” tour. Credit Charlie Neibergall/Associated Press
Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. spoke on Wednesday in front of the statehouse in Des Moines as he helped a group of social justice activists kick off their 10-state “Nuns on the Bus” tour. Credit Charlie Neibergall/Associated Press

DES MOINES — At a Vatican meeting a few years ago, Pope Benedict XVI unexpectedly asked Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. for some advice. “You are being entirely too hard on the American nuns,” Mr. Biden offered. “Lighten up.”

Last year, Mr. Biden seized on an audience with Pope Francis as another opportunity to praise the sisters who remained the target of a Vatican crackdown for their activism on issues like poverty and health care. Continue reading Biden, a Catholic School ‘Kid,’ Praises Nuns Under Fire From the Vatican