Child Migrants

America

Migrants and others cross the Suchiate River where it forms a border between Guatemala and Mexico Dec. 18. The river crossing is part of the main route that Central American migrants follow on their way north. (CNS photo/Paul Jeffrey)
Migrants and others cross the Suchiate River where it forms a border between Guatemala and Mexico Dec. 18. The river crossing is part of the main route that Central American migrants follow on their way north. (CNS photo/Paul Jeffrey)

Dangerous conditions in their homelands are leading tens of thousands more families in Central America and Mexico to send their children to cross the U.S. border illegally by themselves, according to a report by the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops’ Committee on Migration. Continue reading Child Migrants

Energies Clash in Tokyo Election

By Suvendrini Kakuchi.

A protest against nuclear energy in Tokyo. Credit: Suvendrini Kakuchi/IPS.
A protest against nuclear energy in Tokyo. Credit: Suvendrini Kakuchi/IPS.

TOKYO, Feb 7 2014 (IPS) – Tokyo, one of the largest and most energy-guzzling cities in the world, is set to hold elections for a new governor Feb. 9. Analysts say it could prove crucial in stopping the Japanese government from restarting some nuclear reactors this year.

It could also mean a big push for renewable energy.
Continue reading Energies Clash in Tokyo Election

Khaya Dlanga: Is a post-racial South Africa possible?

Mail & Guardian

Tension between the different races will always be an issue if we don’t address the economic challenges we face in our country, says Khaya Dlanga.

When everyone has the same opportunities South Africa will become post-racial. (Reuters)
When everyone has the same opportunities South Africa will become post-racial. (Reuters)

There is one moment that opened my eyes and made me realize that there was something wrong in the country we live in. I had not yet turned 10 and I lived in a village that was about 3km from the N1 in Transkei. It was during the school holidays, when my cousins and I would have to look after my grandfather’s cattle. Although the grazing fields were fenced, some parts of the fence were broken, and others were low enough for the cows to jump over, so we would stand near the N1 to make sure they did not go on to the road and cause accidents or, God forbid, get run over.
Continue reading Khaya Dlanga: Is a post-racial South Africa possible?

Fracking is depleting water supplies in America’s driest areas, report shows

Guardian

From Texas to California, drilling for oil and gas is using billions of gallons of water in the country’s most drought-prone areas

Suzanne Goldenberg, US environment correspondent

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America’s oil and gas rush is depleting water supplies in the driest and most drought-prone areas of the country, from Texas to California, new research has found.
Continue reading Fracking is depleting water supplies in America’s driest areas, report shows

U.S. Reforming “Outdated” Overseas Food Aid

By Carey L. Biron

Crowley Logistics in Miami, Florida is one of three U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) shipping and logistics facilities in the nation. In times of emergency humanitarian relief aid, they can respond with supplies delivered to aircraft at Miami International Airport within two hours. Credit: USDA Photo by Lance Cheung
Crowley Logistics in Miami, Florida is one of three U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) shipping and logistics facilities in the nation. In times of emergency humanitarian relief aid, they can respond with supplies delivered to aircraft at Miami International Airport within two hours. Credit: USDA Photo by Lance Cheung

WASHINGTON, Jan 30 2014 (IPS) – U.S. lawmakers are in the final stages of approving reforms to a half-century-old system of providing overseas food assistance that critics say is outdated, inefficient and sometimes harmful to local economies in developing countries.
Continue reading U.S. Reforming “Outdated” Overseas Food Aid

Nigeria: At least 138 killed in weekend terror attacks 30/01/2014

Christian Solidarity Worldwide

nig2At least 138 people are now known to have died on 26 January in attacks by members of the Islamist terror group Boko Haram on villages in Adamawa and Borno States in north east Nigeria.

Around 53 people are reported to have died and dozens were wounded in Adamawa State when militants armed with AK-47s and improvised explosive devices (IED’s) attacked a Catholic church in Wada Chakawa in Madagali Local Government Area (LGA) just as a busy Sunday service was ending. After killing a police inspector and sergeant who were guarding the church, the gunmen barred the doors, shooting anyone attempting to escape through windows. They cut the throats of several victims before burning houses and holding residents hostage for four hours.  According to the chairman of Madagali LGA, the assailants went on to invade a border village before retreating into neighbouring Cameroon.
Continue reading Nigeria: At least 138 killed in weekend terror attacks 30/01/2014