Brazil’s Prison Violence Worsens in Maranhão

From: SandraAraújo Santos, SNDdeN
Hi people, there goes a petition asking for federal intervention in the state of Maranhão because the problems with the state prision system and the reality of violence lived on these days. I already signed it.           AVAAZ.org
By Fabiola Ortiz
RIO DE JANEIRO, Jan 28 2014 (IPS) – Nearly every day, violence breaks out in a Brazilian prison. In January the focus has been on the northeastern state of Maranhão, where orders issued from behind bars wreaked havoc in the streets of its capital city, illustrating the scope of national prison anarchy. Continue reading Brazil’s Prison Violence Worsens in Maranhão

Human Trafficking Survivors Urge U.S. to Take Action

By Bryant Harris

Child labourers rescued in Delhi waiting to be sent back to their villages. Credit: Bachpan Bachao Andolan/IPS
Child labourers rescued in Delhi waiting to be sent back to their villages. Credit: Bachpan Bachao Andolan/IPS

WASHINGTON, Jan 28 2014 (IPS) – Advocacy groups and some legislators are calling on the U.S. government to mandate an increase in corporate supply chain transparency, with the aim of cutting down on the estimated 14,000 to 17,000 people trafficked into the United States each year and the tens of millions enslaved globally.

“Human trafficking is a 32-billion-dollar industry, second only to drug trafficking as an organized crime,” Melysa Sperber, director of the Alliance to End Slavery and Trafficking (ATEST), a coalition of human rights groups, told a briefing on Capitol Hill on Monday. “Between 21 and 30 million people are enslaved worldwide.”
Continue reading Human Trafficking Survivors Urge U.S. to Take Action

Report: At least 74 dead in twin Nigeria attack

Daily Nation

A Joint Military Task Force (JTF) patrolling the streets of the restive northeastern Nigerian town of Maiduguri, Borno State on April 30, 2013. At least 74 people have been killed and scores others injured in two separate attacks in Northeastern Nigeria. PHOTO/AFP
A Joint Military Task Force (JTF) patrolling the streets of the restive northeastern Nigerian town of Maiduguri, Borno State on April 30, 2013. At least 74 people have been killed and scores others injured in two separate attacks in Northeastern Nigeria. PHOTO/AFP

At least 74 people have been killed and scores others injured in two separate attacks in North eastern Nigeria.

22 people were killed in an attack on a church In Waga Chakaa village in Adamawa state while 52 others were killed in a market in a busy market place on Sunday.

Both attacks have been blamed on Boko Haram.

Gunmen suspected to belong to Boko Haram militia group, opened fire in a church and set off bombs in a busy church service killing 22 people in a siege that lasted four hours.
Continue reading Report: At least 74 dead in twin Nigeria attack

Octogenarian nun awaits sentence for protest break-in at US nuclear plant

The Guardian

Megan Rice was charged with sabotage for breaking into Y-12 facility at Oak Ridge, Tennessee

Sister Megan Rice with Michael Walli (left), and Greg Boertje-Obed. All three were charged with federal sabotage. Photograph: Michael Patrick/AP
Sister Megan Rice with Michael Walli (left), and Greg Boertje-Obed. All three were charged with federal sabotage. Photograph: Michael Patrick/AP

On Monday morning, four days short of her 84th birthday, Sister Megan Rice ate a hearty breakfast of pancakes and oatmeal at the ungodly hour of 4.30am in Knox county jail, Knoxville, Tennessee.

Rice, a white-haired Catholic nun and anti-nuclear activist, was in fine spirits, giving a broad smile and a thumbs-up sign through the glass partition that separates her from visitors to the jail where she is awaiting sentence, according to her good friend, Pat McSweeney.
Continue reading Octogenarian nun awaits sentence for protest break-in at US nuclear plant

South Sudan: calls for humanitarian corridor after ceasefire

Independent Catholic News

Mother and child - South Sudan
Mother and child – South Sudan

Since a ceasefire was agreed in South Sudan, last week, Church and aid agencies have called for greater action from the international community to ensure that the truce holds, and the establishment of an aid corridor to enable much-needed medical and humanitarian support to be delivered.
Continue reading South Sudan: calls for humanitarian corridor after ceasefire

World’s 85 richest own wealth close to that of poorest 3.5B: report

Daily Nation

Davos, Switzerland

According to an Oxfam report, almost half the world’s wealth – $110 trillion – is owned by just 1 per cent of its population.
According to an Oxfam report, almost half the world’s wealth – $110 trillion – is owned by just 1 per cent of its population.

The 85 richest people on the planet have as much wealth as that of half the world’s population, a meeting of political and financial leaders in Davos has been told.

According to an Oxfam report, almost half the world’s wealth – $110 trillion – is owned by less than one per cent of its population.
Continue reading World’s 85 richest own wealth close to that of poorest 3.5B: report

Elites Will ‘Consider Inequality’

Ray Smith

Development issues find little place in Davos. Credit: Ray Smith/IPS.
Development issues find little place in Davos. Credit: Ray Smith/IPS.

DAVOS, Switzerland, Jan 22 2014 (IPS) – With no acute crisis on the radar, this year’s Annual Meeting of the World Economic Forum (WEF) will move away from the response mode of the past years and “look for solutions for the really fundamental issues,” its founder Klaus Schwab said at the pre-meeting press conference.

“We cannot afford to allow the next era of globalization to create as many risks and inequities as it does opportunities,” Schwab wrote in a blog post a few days earlier. “Today we face a situation where the number of potential flashpoints are many and are likely to grow.”
Continue reading Elites Will ‘Consider Inequality’

Kenya’s Scorched Earth Removal of Forest’s Indigenous

By Matthew Newsome

A torched Sengwer home in western Kenya’s Embobut forest. The indigenous Sengwer tribe are being forcibly removed from the area as part of the government’s attempt to preserve one of the country’s water towers. Courtesy: Justin Kenrick/Forest Peoples Programme
A torched Sengwer home in western Kenya’s Embobut forest. The indigenous Sengwer tribe are being forcibly removed from the area as part of the government’s attempt to preserve one of the country’s water towers. Courtesy: Justin Kenrick/Forest Peoples Programme

NAIROBI, Jan 24 2014 (IPS) – Kenyan government security forces are forcefully evicting thousands of people, including the indigenous Sengwer tribe, from the Embobut forest in western Kenya by burning homes and possessions in an effort to promote forest conservation, safeguard urban water access and “remove squatters”.

“The Kenya Forest Guard is burning homes and belongings in the Embobut forest area. They are threatening [people] with AK-47 guns. Gunfire has caused chaos as families run to hide in the mountain forest,” Yator Kiptum, a member of the Sengwer community, told IPS.
Continue reading Kenya’s Scorched Earth Removal of Forest’s Indigenous

Why Cutting the Child Tax Credit Is Bad Policy

National Immigration Law Canter (NILC)

Nearly every year, members of Congress attempt to end the refundable Child Tax Credit (CTC) for workers who pay their taxes using an Individual Tax Identification Number (ITIN) instead of a Social Security number (SSN). This cut would affect workers who are ineligible for an SSN and therefore pay taxes to the federal government using the only means legally permitted—the ITIN. The CTC, as well as the refundable portion (the Additional Child Tax Credit, or ACTC) were enacted to help struggling families financially care for their children. The CTC has proven successful in preventing millions of children from sinking further into poverty.
Continue reading Why Cutting the Child Tax Credit Is Bad Policy