Nobel Laureate Fights African Pullout from Global Court

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By Thalif Deen Reprint

Desmond Tutu, the Archbishop emeritus of Capetown and one of the world's most renowned human rights activists. UN Photo/Jean-Marc Ferré
Desmond Tutu, the Archbishop emeritus of Capetown and one of the world’s most renowned human rights activists. UN Photo/Jean-Marc Ferré

UNITED NATIONS, Oct 10 2013 (IPS) – South Africa’s Desmond Tutu, the 1984 Nobel Peace prize laureate, has launched a global campaign to stop African nations from abandoning the Hague-based International Criminal Court (ICC).

Sudan and Kenya, whose political leaders are accused of war crimes and genocide, are leading the movement against the ICC and have already threatened to pull out of the tribunal.

Tutu, the Archbishop emeritus of Capetown and one of the world’s most renowned human rights activists, has appealed to leaders of South Africa and Nigeria, two of the most powerful countries in Africa, “to stop Sudan and Kenya from trying to drag Africa out of the ICC”.
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Why Keeping Girls in School Can Help South Sudan

By Agnes Odhiambo

As a result of decades of civil war, many adults and children in South Sudan did not go to school. Government statistics for 2011 show that only 39 percent of primary school students and 30 percent of secondary students are female. Credit: John Robinson/IPS
As a result of decades of civil war, many adults and children in South Sudan did not go to school. Government statistics for 2011 show that only 39 percent of primary school students and 30 percent of secondary students are female. Credit: John Robinson/IPS

NAIROBI, Oct 10 2013 (IPS) – Mary K. loved to study and wanted to be an accountant. However, when she was 16 and in class six (grade eight), her father forced her to leave school to marry a 50-year-old man who paid him 60 cows.

Mary pleaded with her father to keep her in school. But her father was adamant. “He said it is a waste of money to educate a girl and that girls are born so that people can eat,” Mary told me in 2012, when I visited South Sudan to interview girls and women about child and forced marriages. “He said marriage, not education, will bring me respect in the community.”
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Judge praises anti-drone protesters who broke into RAF base

Independent Catholic News

By: Dan Bergin

church3Six protesters who broke into RAF Waddington in Lincolnshire, home of Britain’s first unmanned drones base, were found guilty of criminal damage on Monday. But Judge John Stobart described them as “dutiful people” saying he passed the sentence with a “heavy heart” and would welcome an appeal.

Susan Clarkson, Christopher Cole, Henrietta Cullinan, Anglican clergyman Rev Keith Hebden, Catholic priest Fr Martin Newell and Penelope Walker all denied criminal damage to a fence belonging to the RAF on 3 June, International Child Victims of War Day. After getting over a fence they spent more than half an hour walking around the base distributing leaflets and taking photographs as well as planting a fig tree and a vine as symbols of peace. The group were described as polite and non-threatening. RAF Waddington was put on lockdown until the situation was resolved by the arrival of civilian police.
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TPP a Trojan horse

Asia Times

By Sachie Mizohata and the Association of University Faculties

(See petition against the Trans-Pacific Partnership agreement here in English and or here in Japanese.

trojan-horseThe Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) Agreement is a proposed trade pact that Japan is negotiating with Australia, Brunei, Canada, Chile, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Peru, Singapore, the United States, and Vietnam (as of September 2013). The TPP aims to increase the liberalization of economies in the Pacific region through abolition of tariffs on trade as well as reregulation. [1]

In 2008, the United States joined the talks “and has espoused a hard core complete free trade policy”, which has vastly expanded the scope of the negotiations. [2] With both the US and Japan as participants, the pact would cover nearly 40% of the world’s economy. [3] Japan officially joined one of final rounds of the negotiations in July 2013 in Malaysia, as the participating countries intend to finalize the TPP negotiations (at least partially) by the end of 2013. [4]
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Mayors Leading an Urban Revolution

By Stephen Leahy

Part of the Sustainable Urban Masterplan for Shanghai, this image shows the channels with pedestrian and slow traffic lanes on the right, and urban food gardens on the left. The channel transports water from vertical farm to vertical farm, cooling the city and being filtered through various plants and organisms along the way. Credit: Except Integrated/cc by 2.0
Part of the Sustainable Urban Masterplan for Shanghai, this image shows the channels with pedestrian and slow traffic lanes on the right, and urban food gardens on the left. The channel transports water from vertical farm to vertical farm, cooling the city and being filtered through various plants and organisms along the way. Credit: Except Integrated/cc by 2.0

NANTES, France, Oct 5 2013 (IPS) – With presidents and prime ministers failing to take meaningful action to avert a planetary-scale climate crisis, the mayors of cities and towns are increasingly stepping up to enact changes at the local level.

“Cities are on the front lines of climate change,” Richard Register, founder and president of Ecocity Builders, an organisation that pioneered ecological city design and planning, told IPS.

With the backing of their residents, many cities and towns around the world are becoming cleaner, greener and better places to live by banning cars, improving mass transit, reducing energy use and growing their own food while adding public and green spaces.
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