Young and Alone, Facing Court and Deportation

New York Times

Michael Stravato for The New York Times

In Deportation, Age 6: Liliana Muñoz, 6, was alone when Border Patrol officers caught her as she was being smuggled across the Rio Grande. Now facing deportation, she’s also alone in Immigration Court without a lawyer.  The immigrant who was facing deportation rose to his feet, in a clean T-shirt and khaki pants several sizes too large, with his name — JUAN — printed on a tag around his neck.   But the judge could not see him. Juan’s head did not rise above the court’s wooden benches.   Juan David Gonzalez was 6 years old. He was in the court, which would decide whether to expel him from the country, without a parent — and also without a lawyer. Continue reading Young and Alone, Facing Court and Deportation

Insecurity – Catholic Archbishop Calls for Overhaul of Political System

AllAfrica.com

By Sam Eyoboka and Olayinka Latona, 27 August 2012

Lagos — CATHOLIC Archbishop of Lagos, Most Rev. Alfred Adewale Martins, yesterday, advocated an overhaul of the nation’s political system as a means of addressing the current security challenges just as the Deputy Speaker of the House of Representatives, Emeka Ihedioha assured Nigerians that the National Assembly won’t disappoint them. Continue reading Insecurity – Catholic Archbishop Calls for Overhaul of Political System

Zuma hits back as mining unrest spreads

Africa Confidential

The Marikana massacre shocked South Africans and unnerved the markets but President Zuma tells the trades unions that he needs another term

A rousing welcome at a national trades union conference and a belated wage deal at the Marikana platinum mines are the first signs that President Jacob Zuma is fighting back. He has been under fire over his handling of the crisis at Lonmin’s platinum mine at Marikana, North-West Province, where police shot 34 striking miners dead on 16 August (AC Vol 53 No 17,The Marikana massacre). The worst state violence since the end of apartheid looked as if it might cost Zuma his chances of re-election as President of the governing African National Congress (ANC) at its December conference. Continue reading Zuma hits back as mining unrest spreads

Drone attacks in Pakistan are counterproductive, says report

The Guardian

US academics’ report says drones kill large numbers of civilians and increase recruitment by militant groups

Owen Bowcott, legal affairs correspondent  

The CIA’s programme of “targeted” drone killings in Pakistan’s tribal heartlands is politically counterproductive, kills large numbers of civilians and undermines respect for international law, according to a report by US academics.  The study by Stanford and New York universities’ law schools, based on interviews with victims, witnesses and experts, blames the US president, Barack Obama, for the escalation of “signature strikes” in which groups are selected merely through remote “pattern of life” analysis.  Families are afraid to attend weddings or funerals, it says, in case US ground operators guiding drones misinterpret them as gatherings of Taliban or al-Qaida militants. Continue reading Drone attacks in Pakistan are counterproductive, says report

Examining the Role of Rwanda in the DRC Insurgency: It’s Not the Only Problem

AFJN

by Jacques Bahati

On Wednesday, September 19, 2012 the Subcommittee on Africa, Global Health, and Human Rights of the US House of Representatives held a hearing on the ongoing crisis in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC).   The distinguished panel elaborated on the Rwanda’s role in the crisis, but almost nothing was said about weak leadership in DRC.  It is a serious mistake not to underscore that the solutions to DRC’s problems reside inside DRC because the core of the crisis is internal.  No matter how much help the international community can and will give to DRC, unless the issue of governance is resolved, the crisis in DRC will continue to worsen. Continue reading Examining the Role of Rwanda in the DRC Insurgency: It’s Not the Only Problem

KENYA: Churches ask Govt. to Address Root Causes of Skirmishes

NAIROBI, September 21, 2012 (CISA) –The Church in Kenya has urged the government to ensure security in the country. This comes in the wake of recent killings in Tana River delta where clashes led to the death of over a hundred people.  At a press conference held on September, 20 at Waumini house, church leaders voiced their concern over the skirmishes and questioned the manner in which the Government handled them. Continue reading KENYA: Churches ask Govt. to Address Root Causes of Skirmishes

Fishermen Paralyze Construction of the Belo Monte Dam

Amazon Watch

Zachary Hurwitz

A group of about 50 fishermen prevented a ferry from transporting machines and workers to a coffer dam being built for the Belo Monte Dam complex and set up a protest camp on one of the main islands of the Xingu River near the construction site.  After assembling, the protesters decided to remain in place indefinitely and called on Norte Energia and IBAMA to immediately negotiate compensation for the loss of ecologically sensitive fish species that the fishermen have suffered as a result of the coffer dam’s construction. Continue reading Fishermen Paralyze Construction of the Belo Monte Dam

New Trans-Pacific Trade Deal Ignites Fears of Job Losses

Common Dreams

US manufacturers fear secretly negotiated trade deal a ‘race to the bottom’

by Rob Hotakainen

LEESBURG, Va. — With 1,350 employees in its five U.S. factories, New Balance is proud that it still produces 7 million pairs of shoes each year at its plants in Maine and Massachusetts, the last major athletic footwear company that still has manufacturing jobs in the United States.  But the company says those jobs could very well disappear if the U.S. scraps its tariff on athletic footwear coming in from Vietnam. Continue reading New Trans-Pacific Trade Deal Ignites Fears of Job Losses