Africa’s Oil Spills Are Far From U.S. Media Glare

Reuters

by Joe Brock

In this Dec. 22, 2005 file photo, people evacuate their homes by boat, as they pass smoke and flames billowing from a burning oil pipeline belonging to the Shell Petroleum Development Company, across the Opobo Channel in Asagba Okwan Asarama, some 50 kilometers (31 miles) southwest of Port Harcourt, Nigeria. (AP Photo/George Osodi, File)

LONDON – Oil gushing from an undersea well in the Gulf of Mexico has damaged BP’s reputation and share price but accidents involving other companies in less scrutinized parts of the world have avoided the media glare.

Investors have knocked around $30 billion off BP’s value since an explosion at a drilling rig killed 11 people and began an oil spill the London-based major is struggling to plug nearly a month after the accident happened. Continue reading Africa’s Oil Spills Are Far From U.S. Media Glare

New Law to Promote Locals in Oil Industry

Sam Olukoya

Environmental damage in the Niger Delta: will a new law at least trade jobs exchange jobs for devastation? Credit: Dulue Mbachu/

IRIN LAGOS, Apr 23 (IPS) – “This bill seeks to address the compelling need for us as a nation to have indigenous participation in the industry.” With these words, Nigeria’s acting President, Goodluck Jonathan, signed the Nigerian Oil and Gas Industry Content Development Bill into law.

The new law seeks to achieve greater indigenous participation in Nigeria’s oil and gas industry which in the last five decades have been dominated by multinational companies. A wide range of services and products which have been procured abroad must now be sourced locally. Continue reading New Law to Promote Locals in Oil Industry

KENYA: Green and Red, Symbols for Referendum

NAIROBI, May 18, 2010 (CISA) -Kenyans have moved another step closer to approving or rejecting the Proposed Constitution with the announcement of the referendum symbols.

After sifting through more than 350 proposed symbols submitted by Kenyans ­ including forks, spoons, trees and even the moon ­ the poll managers finally gave their verdict: the word YES on a green background for those supporting the proposed constitution, and the word NO on a red background for those opposing it. Continue reading KENYA: Green and Red, Symbols for Referendum

Five Questions Monsanto Needs to Answer about its Seed Donation to Haiti

Civil Eats

By Timi Gerson
Monsanto has donated $4 million in seeds to Haiti, sending 60 tons of conventional hybrid corn and vegetable seed, followed by 70 more tons of corn seed last week with an additional 345 tons of corn seed to come during the next year. Yet the number one recommendation of a recent report by Catholic Relief Services on post-earthquake Haiti is to focus on local seed fairs and not to introduce new or “improved” varieties at this time. Continue reading Five Questions Monsanto Needs to Answer about its Seed Donation to Haiti

MONUC to leave the DRC, mission unaccomplished?

Institute for Security Studies

With celebrations of the 50th anniversary of independence coming up in June this year, as well as important elections next year, the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) government is keen for the United Nations (UN) peacekeeping mission, known as MONUC, to start withdrawing within the next few months. They want MONUC out of the mission area by September 2011. Continue reading MONUC to leave the DRC, mission unaccomplished?

Inside the Tragedy of African Migration

Institute for Security Studies

Gao, in northeastern Mali, is closer to Algeria than to the capital Bamako, 1250km to the south. On a journey from Bamako to Gao – an uninterrupted 22 hours on a bus – I meet Mohamed (21) and Camara (26), two young men determined to reach the Algerian capital Algiers and from there travel on to Europe – their imagined Eldorado. While the stories of these two young men cannot be generalised, they are largely representative of the motives and conditions of many young Africans who embark on perilous journeys to try and reach Europe illegally. Continue reading Inside the Tragedy of African Migration

Africa Has Less Say After Changes in World Bank Voting

By Hilaire Avril

PARIS, May 17, 2010 (IPS) – The World Bank has described its recent increase of 3.13 percent in the voting power of emerging economies as a reform “to enhance voice and participation of developing and transition countries”. But the shift has actually decreased a third of African countries’ share of votes. Continue reading Africa Has Less Say After Changes in World Bank Voting