South Africa: The new struggle: one school, one library, one librarian

www.africafiles.org

African Charter Article# 17: Every individual shall have the right to education, cultural life, and the promotion and protection of values.

Summary & Comment: As South Africa prepared to welcome the world to the World Cup for football, school children marched peacefully through the centre of Cape Town asking for books. Fewer than 7% of South African schools have a functioning library. The authors of the article, Graeme Bloch and Njabulo S Ndebele ask why pupils must beg the government for what is rightly theirs. JDN Continue reading South Africa: The new struggle: one school, one library, one librarian

Time for mining giants to share the spoils.

Big Issue Magazine

An abundance of gold, platinum, copper and diamond fields have brought more misery to Africa than wealth. After decades of ploughing the earth for its riches, the minining company’s promises to transform poverty into prosperity have come to naught. Instead, the reality consists of a privileged few lining their pockets, endemic corruption, human rights abuses and a neglect of local communities and their environment. So it’s no surprise that ANC Youth League President, Julius Malema’s call to nationalise the mines and share the wealth among the people has been met with elation by many in of South Africa’s poor and working classes, and fear by the custodians of a few in big business. Continue reading Time for mining giants to share the spoils.

Economy vs. environment: A vicious cycle in Latin America

LIMA, Peru (CNS) — Although mining has driven Peru’s economic growth through most of the past decade, indigenous farmers high in the Andes say they have not seen the benefits. The Aymara villagers in Condoraque were left with what officials call an “environmental liability” — mine tailings and a stream of acidic water draining from an old mine into the streams and lake that are their only sources of water for drinking, washing, irrigating crops and watering their alpacas during the dry season. The farmers say the pollution has sickened their animals and made their meat unfit to eat. Continue reading Economy vs. environment: A vicious cycle in Latin America

Nigerian President Yar’Adua is dead, says an aide

BBC

Mr Yar’Adua had suffered from heart and kidney conditions

Fifty-eight-year-old Nigerian President Umaru Yar’Adua is dead, a presidential aide has told the BBC.

A spokesman, who did not want to be named, said Mr Yar’Adua died on Wednesday, although there has been no official announcement yet.

Mr Yar’Adua, who became president in 2007, had been ill for some time, and had not been seen in public for months. Continue reading Nigerian President Yar’Adua is dead, says an aide

Hatoyama promises again to ease base burden on Okinawa after rally

Kyodo News

TOKYO, April 26 KYODO

Prime Minister Yukio Hatoyama promised again Monday to try to alleviate the burden of hosting U.S. military facilities on people in Okinawa Prefecture and remove safety risks posed by a U.S. Marine base there, following the previous day’s massive protest rally in the village of Yomitan.

Chief Cabinet Secretary Hirofumi Hirano, meanwhile, on Monday denied the possibility that the government will end up accepting an existing plan to transfer the U.S. Marine Corps’ Futemma Air Station in Ginowan to another city in the southernmost prefecture. Continue reading Hatoyama promises again to ease base burden on Okinawa after rally

Second rancher found guilty in murder of Dorothy Stang

National Catholic reporter – Sent by Maureen Turlish, SND

Verdict seen as test for Brazil to begin to end the lawlessness in the Amazon region

A court in Brazil May 1 sentenced a second rancher to 30 years in prison for ordering the murder in 2005 of Sister of Notre Dame de Namur Dorothy Stang, who defended poor peasants and opposed the destruction of the Amazon rain forest. Continue reading Second rancher found guilty in murder of Dorothy Stang

Church leaders are spinning their wheels

National Catholic Reporter

by Maureen Paul Turlish on May. 04, 2010

The institutional Roman Catholic church can attack every newspaper in every country in the world but that will not change the fact that as an institution it has participated in an extremely well documented, egregious pattern of enabling and covering up for the sexual abuse of thousands of innocent children the world over during almost an entire century. Continue reading Church leaders are spinning their wheels

Hans Küng open letter to Catholic Bishops

Independent Catholic News

Hans Küng

Venerable Bishops,

Theologian Hans Küng sent the following open letter to all Catholic Bishops on Friday.

Joseph Ratzinger, now Pope Benedict XVI, and I were the youngest theologians at the Second Vatican Council from 1962 to 1965. Now we are the oldest and the only ones still fully active. I have always understood my theological work as a service to the Roman Catholic Church. For this reason, on the occasion of the fifth anniversary of the election of Pope Benedict XVI, I am making this appeal to you in an open letter. In doing so, I am motivated by my profound concern for our church, which now finds itself in the worst credibility crisis since the Reformation. Please excuse the form of an open letter; unfortunately, I have no other way of reaching you. Continue reading Hans Küng open letter to Catholic Bishops

The African Synod: A Task for the Future

Kizito’s Blog

The following is the transript of an interview I gave to a English-speaking mass media.

As it has been underlined by many commentators, the theme chosen by Pope Benedict XVI for the Second African Synod,  The Church in Africa in Service to Reconciliation, Justice and Peace,” is extremely relevant. It focuses on the main issues of the African public life today, issues on which the Catholic Church has the moral authority and the competence to speak and act, especially when considering the dramatic failure of the modern African states and governments, born out of the colonial time, to address them. Continue reading