No Justice for Indians in Amazon Massacre

By Ángel Páez

LIMA, Feb 19, 2010 (IPS) – Although the technical investigations cleared two of the indigenous demonstrators accused in the murders of 12 policemen during a bloody June 2009 clash between native protesters and the security forces near the northern Amazon jungle town of Bagua, they are still behind bars.

Feliciano Cahuasa and Danny López have been in prison for over eight months, despite the fact that technical crime scene investigations showed that neither of them fired a single shot, and that they are thus innocent of the Jun. 5 killings of the police officers. Continue reading No Justice for Indians in Amazon Massacre

Advocates push Congress to reform volatile food commodity markets

Catholic News Service

By Dennis Sadowski
WASHINGTON (CNS) — Two years ago riots erupted in at least 15 developing countries over the rising cost of basic foods. Frustrated that rapidly rising prices were outstripping their ability to buy much-needed food, angry demonstrators torched vehicles and clashed with police in a series of violent confrontations across Africa, Asia, South America and the Caribbean. Continue reading Advocates push Congress to reform volatile food commodity markets

The Affording Hope Project

Dear Friend in Faith:
The Affording Hope Project presents Leaps and Bounds, a one woman show which explores the intersection of faith, ecology, and the global economy. Using storytelling, song, movement, music, poetry and prayer, this work of theater sheds light on the driving factors of our environmental crisis while awakening the imagination to a new way of living with and relating to Earth. Grounded in theological reflection, this performance illuminates the quality of life available should we trust in God’s abundance and adopt the practices of Sabbath Economics. Continue reading The Affording Hope Project

One Million Casualties of Land Reform

Ann Hellman


Since 2000, up to 75 percent of farmworkers in Zimbabwe have been evicted by govt-sponsored land seizures.Credit: IRIN

JOHANNESBURG and CAPE TOWN, Jan 25 (IPS) – The seizure of large commercial farms – almost all white-owned – has continued despite the formation of a unity government in Zimbabwe. The country’s farm workers say they are the biggest losers.

The workers say that Southern African Development Community (SADC) leaders must intervene immediately to stop the violence against them. Continue reading One Million Casualties of Land Reform

Land restitution: an unacceptable glacial drift

SA NGO Net

The Restitution Programme – one of the three pillars of the National Land Reform Programme – was started by a skeletal working group in 1993. Later on, the Restitution of Land Rights Act 22 of 1994 together with the Constitution formed the basis of the Restitution Programme. The Restitution of Land Rights Act was one of the first pieces of legislation to be passed by the new democratic government, probably because the restitution process was politically expedient and widely perceived as legitimate (Du Plessis, 2003). Continue reading Land restitution: an unacceptable glacial drift

South Africa: Forgotten intellectuals – Revisiting the struggle against apartheid

Pambazuka News

Teachers, writers, and intellectuals in the Non-European Unity Movement made a significant contribution to the liberation struggle. NEUM was the first organisation in South Africa to adopt non-racialism and reject African ‘inferiority’ put forward under apartheid. Its politics of anti-imperialism and non-racialism learned from the Unity Movement “sent young people marching, protesting, and fighting for democracy in the 1970s and 80s.” Continue reading South Africa: Forgotten intellectuals – Revisiting the struggle against apartheid

SOUTH AFRICA: Inequality not so black and white


Photo: Bonile Bam/IRIN
Poverty levels remain

8 February 2010 (IRIN) – The growing gulf between the haves and have-nots in the black population has given South Africa the dubious distinction of becoming one of the world’s most unequal societies, according to a recent report by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), an inter-government body. Continue reading SOUTH AFRICA: Inequality not so black and white

Shell in the Niger Delta: A Framework for Change – five case-studies from civil society

Ecumenical Council for Corporate Responsibility

ECCR’s most recent report documents, and provides an update on, the social and environmental impacts of the operations of Royal Dutch Shell’s Nigerian subsidiary, the Shell Petroleum Development Company (SPDC), and explores what needs to change.

At the report’s core are five case studies commissioned from civil society organisations that work with Niger Delta communities. Questions that the report seeks to address include: Continue reading Shell in the Niger Delta: A Framework for Change – five case-studies from civil society