Kudos, Knocks For Yar’Adua: Commends Him on Rule of Law

The catholic Bishops of Nigeria have commended the president of the Federal Republic of Nigeria, Alhaji Umaru Musa Yar’Adua on his activities since assumption of office. The commendation was made at the end of its second plenary meeting for the year 2008 held in Jos, plateau state from September 8th- 13th, 2008. The communiqué stated as follows: “we commend the one year in office of President Umaru Musa Yar’Adua. We note an increase in peace and tranquility, religious co-existence, fairness and the rule of law. We appreciate his seven point agenda and look forward to their full implementation. We appeal to all Nigerians to embrace the agenda and contribute to make them work. We urge the president not to lose focus, but to continue his positive agenda for our nation’s political stability and socio economic development. Above all, he should earnestly sustain the fight against corruption at all levels of the society. The failure of leader to live simply perpetuates the scourge of corruption’.

Commending him on the religious harmony in the country, the bishops further said “dialogue between Christians and Muslims is bearing fruit in some areas, leading to greater tolerance, harmonious co-existence and peace. This should be extended, promoted and sustained in every part of the country”.

Continuing, the prelates said, “We commend the Niger Delta Development Commission (NDDC)/ church consultations through which government agencies of the Niger Delta region collaborate with Christian’s leaders in solving problem in the region and charting the way forward”.

The chief shepherds, however, expressed worry at the high level of insecurity in the country. The communiqué reads: “insecurity, characterized by spates of armed robbery, kidnapping and killing, adds to sense hopelessness” of the citizens.
Similarly, the Bishop of condemned failure to improve the kidnapping and energy sector stating that “despite huge capital investment in the power sector, incessant power failure is still the lot of Nigerians. Creating an atmosphere of despair”
Lending a tacit support to the call for the passage of the freedom of information (FOI) bill, the pastors said, “We cannot talk of democracy without the freedom of information duly put in place make it work.
The free flow of information promotes participation, which is the engine that drives democracy. The hoarding of information on the contrary, leads to dictatorship, corruption, marginalization and anarchy”.
The church hierarchy expressed dissatisfaction over the management of disasters in the country noting that, “the petroleum fire in Ijegun (Lagos) which took the lives of many Nigerians, illustrates the volatile nature of the nation’s social life.
Government should do more to prevent all man-made disasters.

Pipelines should not be carelessly exposed but buried deep. Strict regulations for building
structures should be put in place and enforced to forestall any subsequent {building} collapse.  More fire fighting equipments should be strategically located to deal with any fire accidents.

Furthermore, they observed with concern the recent global food crisis which “raises deep questions about the state of agriculture in Nigeria. Given over over-dependence on the oil sector, the agricultural sector is still grossly neglected. Government policy on agriculture is often not properly thought through, haphazardly implemented, or aborted midway”. The Bishops frowned at a situation where “the fertilizer subsidized by the government to boost agriculture is sadly left at the hands of the greedy rich who buy from government and sell to the poor farmers at cut throat prices”

The Bishops further prayed for Gods’ assistance on the nation and church even as it prepares to celebrate the World Family Day in 2009 emphasizing that the family is the basic cell of the society and the church and reminding all families of the “grave obligation to transmit to their members the moral values, spiritual heritage and cultural legacy, indispensable for good citizenshi

The catholic Bishops of Nigeria have commended the president of the Federal Republic of Nigeria, Alhaji Umaru Musa Yar’Adua on his activities since assumption of office. The commendation was made at the end of its second plenary meeting for the year 2008 held in Jos, plateau state from September 8th- 13th, 2008. The communiqué stated as follows: “we commend the one year in office of President Umaru Musa Yar’Adua. We note an increase in peace and tranquility, religious co-existence, fairness and the rule of law. We appreciate his seven point agenda and look forward to their full implementation. We appeal to all Nigerians to embrace the agenda and contribute to make them work. We urge the president not to lose focus, but to continue his positive agenda for our nation’s political stability and socio economic development. Above all, he should earnestly sustain the fight against corruption at all levels of the society. The failure of leader to live simply perpetuates the scourge of corruption’.

Commending him on the religious harmony in the country, the bishops further said “dialogue between Christians and Muslims is bearing fruit in some areas, leading to greater tolerance, harmonious co-existence and peace. This should be extended, promoted and sustained in every part of the country”.

Continuing, the prelates said, “We commend the Niger Delta Development Commission (NDDC)/ church consultations through which government agencies of the Niger Delta region collaborate with Christian’s leaders in solving problem in the region and charting the way forward”.

The chief shepherds, however, expressed worry at the high level of insecurity in the country. The communiqué reads: “insecurity, characterized by spates of armed robbery, kidnapping and killing, adds to sense hopelessness” of the citizens.
Similarly, the Bishop of condemned failure to improve the kidnapping and energy sector stating that “despite huge capital investment in the power sector, incessant power failure is still the lot of Nigerians. Creating an atmosphere of despair”
Lending a tacit support to the call for the passage of the freedom of information (FOI) bill, the pastors said, “We cannot talk of democracy without the freedom of information duly put in place make it work.
The free flow of information promotes participation, which is the engine that drives democracy. The hoarding of information on the contrary, leads to dictatorship, corruption, marginalization and anarchy”.
The church hierarchy expressed dissatisfaction over the management of disasters in the country noting that, “the petroleum fire in Ijegun (Lagos) which took the lives of many Nigerians, illustrates the volatile nature of the nation’s social life.
Government should do more to prevent all man-made disasters.

Pipelines should not be carelessly exposed but buried deep. Strict regulations for building
structures should be put in place and enforced to forestall any subsequent {building} collapse.  More fire fighting equipments should be strategically located to deal with any fire accidents.

Furthermore, they observed with concern the recent global food crisis which “raises deep questions about the state of agriculture in Nigeria. Given over over-dependence on the oil sector, the agricultural sector is still grossly neglected. Government policy on agriculture is often not properly thought through, haphazardly implemented, or aborted midway”. The Bishops frowned at a situation where “the fertilizer subsidized by the government to boost agriculture is sadly left at the hands of the greedy rich who buy from government and sell to the poor farmers at cut throat prices”

The Bishops further prayed for Gods’ assistance on the nation and church even as it prepares to celebrate the World Family Day in 2009 emphasizing that the family is the basic cell of the society and the church and reminding all families of the “grave obligation to transmit to their members the moral values, spiritual heritage and cultural legacy, indispensable for good citizenshi