Mental health response gaps in South Sudan

A local outpatient clinic in Minkaman, Awerial County, South Sudan. Photo: Andrew Green/IRIN
A local outpatient clinic in Minkaman, Awerial County, South Sudan. Photo: Andrew Green/IRIN

Juba, 17 March 2014 (IRIN) – Aid workers warn that while psychosocial support needs will mount for the tens of thousands of displaced people in South Sudan, the resources and skills needed to treat them are in short supply, and there is particular concern for men, who feel targeted in the ongoing fighting.

South Sudan has been no stranger to conflict in its short two-and-a-half year history. Emerging from a civil war with Sudan, the country, especially restive Jonglei State, has seen regular cattle raids, inter-communal clashes and battles between rebel groups and the national army.

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Kariba Dam collapse fears and disaster preparedness in Zimbabwe

 

Kariba - one of the world's biggest dams under threat. Photo: Bill Corcoran/IRIN
Kariba – one of the world’s biggest dams under threat. Photo: Bill Corcoran/IRIN

HARARE, 9 April 2014 (IRIN) – Could fears of the imminent collapse of the more than five-decade-old Kariba Dam on the Zambezi river between Zimbabwe and Zambia spur Zimbabwe into more effective disaster preparedness?

In early March, engineers at a conference organized by the Zambezi River Authority (ZRA, a Zambia-Zimbabwe organization which manages the Kariba Dam) warned that the 128-metre-high dam could collapse, threatening at least 3.5 million people especially in Mozambique and Malawi.

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Ending Modern Slavery Starts in the Boardroom

By Farangis Abdurazokzoda

Child labourers rescued in Delhi waiting to be sent back to their villages. Credit: Bachpan Bachao Andolan/IPS
Child labourers rescued in Delhi waiting to be sent back to their villages. Credit: Bachpan Bachao Andolan/IPS

WASHINGTON, Apr 16 2014 (IPS) – Modern-day slavery can be eradicated from multinational supply chains, but only if global businesses contribute to greater transparency and collaboration, according to new recommendations by Sedex Global and Verite.

“Human trafficking and slavery in the supply chain are global issues,” Mark Robertson, head of marketing and communications at Sedex Global, which provides a collaborative platform for responsible supply-chain data, told IPS.

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KENYA: Handle Operation Humanly, Christian Leaders tell Government

NAIROBI, April 15, 2014 (CISA) -Christian Leaders of mainstream Churches in Kenya on Monday, March 14 urged the government to carry out the current crackdown on illegal immigrants in a humane way.

“Although we acknowledge the determination on the part of government in the fight against terrorism, we call upon the security agencies to handle the ongoing operation in a humane manner; the dignity of life should at all times remain a priority,” the leaders said in a joint statement after meeting at the All Saints Cathedral-Nairobi.

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UN Human Rights Committee Finds US in Violation on 25 Counts

TruthOut

Adam Hudson

(Illustration: Lance Page / t r u t h o u t)
(Illustration: Lance Page / t r u t h o u t)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

While President Obama told the country to “look forward, not backward” when it came to Bush’s torture program, the United Nations has taken a different route. Recently, the UN Human Rights Committee issued a report excoriating the United States for its human rights violations. It focuses on violations of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, to which the country is party. The report mentions 25 human rights issues where the United States is failing. This piece will focus on a few of those issues – Guantanamo, NSA surveillance, accountability for Bush-era human rights violations, drone strikes, racism in the prison system, racial profiling, police violence, and criminalization of the homeless.

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COP Out? Peru Pulling the Plug on Environmental Oversight in View of COP 20

Alianza Arkana

peruPeru was selected to host the COP 20 this December, widely considered to be the paramount meeting on global climate change strategy. Yet only recently, the Peruvian Minister of Energy and Mines, Eleodoro Mayorga Alba, announced that a new Peruvian law would potentially eliminate submission and approval of Environmental Impact Assessments (EIAs) for oil and gas companies during the seismic testing phase. This means that already haphazard and irresponsible enforced oversight practices required for petroleum companies would be further undercut, no longer requiring participatory environmental research prior to exploration.

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